Wingnut Wings 1/32 Fokker E.III (Late)

The impending advent of a brand new model company, comparatively infrequent though it is, always causes a tsunami of excitement amongst plastaholics. That this one pertained to WWI aviation, in arguably that genre’s ideal scale – 1/32 and was backed and bank rolled by Peter Jackson and underpinned by the world class expertise of PJ’s The Vintage Aviator Ltd, was pure jam on top of jam, swamped in cream, with a side order of a bucket of custard.

The launch advertisements gave promise of a ‘Hisso’ engined SE5a, Bristol F2B, Junkers J.1 and an LVG C.VI. WWI modellers were beside themselves when the kits were announced and many in need of hospitalisation in the immediate wake of kit reviews of the extant plastic, brass and sundries. Wallets were emptied and non-essential body parts sold (not all of which, legally owned by the vendor) to fund the hunger for these exquisite jewels of the kit maker’s art.

More remarkable still, there was no real teething issues with the kits (beyond a minor and resolvable query connected to the J.1’s aileron length). It was as though they had been in business for decades – right from the outset. Fit and engineering were exemplary. Accuracy beyond reproach. Quality the equal of Tamiya. The instructions were a revelation; heavy, glossy paper, colour coded directions and reference photographs! Wingnut Wings did not merely feed the appetites of existing WWI buffs – they drew in many new converts and remain today an object lesson for all other companies, established and fledgling, in delivering top drawer kits at fair prices.

It wasn’t long before I had a dozen or more of these beauties in the stash and when editor, Chris Clifford offered the late Eindecker E.III for my third AMW build I snapped his hand off, simultaneously discovering that mild concussion nodding ‘yes’ is indeed a medical reality.

The build was a joy and our courtship, a flurry of rose petals and softly whispered sweet nothings, until we both lay back on consummation of our lust, sated and happy. “I wonder if she has a sister?” I naughtily pondered and indeed she has – three, an E.I, an E.II / III (early) and an E.IV. All this might suggest that that concussion should’ve received medical attention but ‘once a Wingnutter, always a Wingnutter’ and I remain incurably and incorrigibly smitten.

Laminated wooden propellors have several methods of creation. This may be the first and only time AK Interactive’s ‘Track Wash’ has been used in this capacity. The first layer dried rapidly and just one more application (and the Mk.I steady hand) created the dark lamination seen here.

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The kit readily lends itself to sub-assembly methods of construction.

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There are various ways of approaching Fokker’s signature ‘beaten metal’ cowl decoration but I chose Alclad II ALC103 Aluminium as a base with Tamiya’s Chrome Silver brushed on top. From ‘viewing distance’ (not as close here) it works effectively to convey that type of finish.

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Rigging was a combination of Bob’s Buckles, Gas Patch fittings, and Japanese Reflo monofilament fishing line (very soft, flexible and strong).

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It’s not many kits that include a teddy bear in the presentation…

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Even Wingnut’s rigging diagram wasn’t enough to convince me of the correct rigging layout, so a trip to the Science Museum in London was a suitable excuse to unravel the conundrum via their E.III example.

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Bad Wolf

 

2 thoughts on “Wingnut Wings 1/32 Fokker E.III (Late)

  1. Always though this kite was special historically and also the presentation by the crafter of this particular machine. Well done!

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